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Egypt’s Opposition – “Islamists”?

By on Oct 10, 2014 in Politics | 0 comments

Why do many of us still refer to the political opposition and protesters in Egypt as “Islamist”? We use the word regularly, and initially, it made some sort of sense. The military regime, under the pretence of alliance with the National Salvation Front (remember THAT…?), portrayed itself as being Civilian and Secular friendly, and understandably, after a year of religious fascism, people were relieved, as were many Copts. However, time has shown otherwise; the regime has shown absolutely no tolerance for any secularism or diversity in any way shape or form. Sisi’s regime arrests atheists, and in fact, his police force forms special squads to ‘hunt down’ atheists online, homosexuals are under constant threat and if you happen to be a homosexual human rights advocate, for instance, you are easy prey to a brutal regime, since they need not bother with...

Starving for Justice

By on Sep 13, 2014 in Politics | 0 comments

When we speak of the imprisoned protesters in Egypt, many of whom are now, and have been, on a hunger strike, many of us think of the physical pain itself; how hungry you get in the first few days, what you feel as your body starts adapting to the lack of food, and if it’s a complete hunger strike, the body’s slow trip towards finality. The physical pain is indeed, horrific, and, depending on how you strike, can be fatal, but, believe it or not – it is not the main issue – the human body, in the final analysis, adapts, and the end of this particular ‘adaptation’ is often death. The real issue here is the mental, intellectual, and spiritual anguish one must feel in order to resort to turning his own body into a megaphone by which he or she hopes to reach society… It is the anguish of a prisoner, who knows that he is unjustly imprisoned (because...

Imagine…

By on Jul 6, 2014 in Politics | 2 comments

Imagine that your country was run by a corporation. Now imagine this corporation has managed to take over at least a third of the country’s assets. Imagine if this corporation enacted laws that allowed it to enlist most of the young men in the country as slave labor, getting paid peanuts, and having to work all day, sometimes in productive jobs, and sometimes sending men to do nothing more than smoke cigarettes as they stood in a deserted spot of land. Imagine that this corporation was run by a cabal of businessmen who were above all the laws, and subject to none of them – so that they were not held accountable to the country or to its laws. Imagine further that this corporation could not only ignore the law but could actually change laws to suit itself. Imagine if this corporation was not only exempt from taxes, but was actually partly funded by taxes, and received further...

The Alternatives You Ignored

By on Jun 3, 2014 in Politics | 0 comments

A few points need to be made here. First of all, I find it at least a bit strange when people refer to me as part of a ‘you’ that they call the ‘opposition’ and then tell me that this ‘we’ was supposed to create a coalition, and that since we have ‘offered none’ – I therefore have no right to ‘complain’. I am a video producer, a photographer, a graphic designer, a writer, and a musician. I am not, nor have I ever been, a politician. If I protested, it was not for a political party or a political ideology, when I write, it’s not for a party or an ideology, and the only ‘entity’ with which I’ve had any kind of regular attachment is the No Military Trials for Civilians group, of whose work I am very proud and by whose other members I am constantly humbled. My interest in the revolution from Day 1 has...

The Hamdeen Argument

By on May 3, 2014 in Politics | 4 comments

The summer of 2011 must’ve been an incredible time for Hamdeen Sabbahi. He was one of the darlings of the revolution, known as a left-leaning Nasserist (whatever that means), ignored only by the hardcore revolutionaries who would only rubber-stamp a batter front-liner, but mostly admired, and generally just liked by almost everybody else. He was tight with what you could, with some effort, call the civil leaders of the revolution, although most of them were not so much leading as doing their damnest to keep up with the street, and with Tahrir – but he was in. Remember this? I have no idea who took this picture, but look at it for a few seconds…this was in the summer of 2011, whatever credit Tantawi and SCAF had acquired at the start of the revolution was already starting to wear thin, and Hamdeen was, literally, riding on a wave of revolutionary youth. Whatever you...

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